The Department of Transport, together with An Coimisinéir Teanga, is conscious of the need to ensure the consistent and precise use of the Irish language on road traffic signage. 
Chapter 1 outlines the requirements surrounding the Irish Language on Traffic Signs.
 
  • Place Names on Information Signs must be in both English and Irish, expect in certain circumstances
  • All Irish text shall be in italic print, in lower case lettering with initial letters in capitals. Irish script shall be inclined at 15 degrees to the vertical. For details see Chapter 2. The Irish text shall be placed above the corresponding English.

TSM-C1-P13 & P14

USE OF IRISH ON TRAFFIC SIGNS

Place Names on Information Signs
1.1.48
It is a statutory requirement that place names on information signs be in both Irish and English, except:
  • For names of destinations in Gaeltacht areas where there is a direction by statute that only the Irish language version of the placename shall be used;
       and
  • Where the spelling of a place name is similar in both languages, in which case only the Irish form of the name should be shown.
Figure 2.3.8 - Chapter 2 page 30
2.3.8.jpg
Forms and Spelling of Place Names
1.1.49
It should be ensured that the correct forms and spelling of place names are used on traffic signs. In this regard, the following approach should be adopted:
  • Road Authorities should consult the relevant Place-names Orders published as Statutory Instruments;
  • If the place name is not included in a Place-names Orders, the Gazetteer of Ireland (The Placenames Branch of the Ordnance Survey) or www.logainm.ie should be consulted; or
  • In determining the correct Irish form of a place name which is not provided in the above sources, Road Authorities should consult with, and obtain advice from, An Coimisiún Logainmneacha (The Place Names Commission). Before consulting with An Coimisiún, Road Authorities may wish to ascertain through local consultation whether specific place names have a particular local significance or what traditional local usage may exist.
Signs Not Depicting Place Names
1.1.50
All other fixed information and warning signs, including supplementary plates, containing text shall be bilingual.
1.1.51
Where a considerable amount of text is required, such that there is a danger that the impact of the message may be diluted, separate Irish and English signs should be used
1.1.52
It should be noted that abbreviations such as ‘m’, ‘km’ and ‘km/h’ are Système International units and, as such, are not in any particular language. Similarly, ‘STOP’ is recognised as an international word which does not require translation.
Format of Text
1.1.53
All Irish text shall be in italic print, in lower case lettering with initial letters in capitals. Irish script shall be inclined at 15 degrees to the vertical. For details see Chapter 2. The Irish text shall be placed above the corresponding English.
Figure 2.3.3 - Chapter 2 page 28
1.1.54
All English text should be in upper case Roman alphabet. For details see Chapter 2.
freagra.png
To ensure correct text is placed on signage please refer to Freagra.
  • Freagra offers speedy and expert advice in your preferred format
  • Freagra is a free service, fully funded by the Irish language development body, Foras na Gaeilge and staffed by the editors of acmhainn.ie

Traffic Signs and The Irish Language